vivalasurf
Travel is little beds and cramped bathrooms. It’s old television sets and slow Internet connections. Travel is extraordinary conversations with ordinary people. It’s waiters, gas station attendants, and housekeepers becoming the most interesting people in the world. It’s churches that are compelling enough to enter. It’s McDonald’s being a luxury. It’s the realization that you may have been born in the wrong country. Travel is a smile that leads to a conversation in broken English. It’s the epiphany that pretty girls smile the same way all over the world. Travel is tipping 10% and being embraced for it. Travel is the same white T-shirt again tomorrow. Travel is accented sex after good wine and too many unfiltered cigarettes. Travel is flowing in the back of a bus with giggly strangers. It’s a street full of bearded backpackers looking down at maps. Travel is wishing for one more bite of whatever that just was. It’s the rediscovery of walking somewhere. It’s sharing a bottle of liquor on an overnight train with a new friend. Travel is ‘Maybe I don’t have to do it that way when I get back home.
― Nick Miller, Isn’t It Pretty to Think So? (via loveisaturnerquest)

(Source: maddierose)

I’m not worried about little girls wanting to pretend they’re princesses—after all, they’re just in it for the dress-up aspect. The princesses I’m worried about are twenty-two, thirty-two, and forty-two—women who act fragile in order to be rescued at any age. I’m not anti feminine… I don’t feel belittled pouring your drink, ironing the clothes, or walking through the door that’s held for me. But I was taught to take charge when appropriate, and to speak passionately and intelligently. I was taught to expect men to respect me for my mind and my convictions—not for my ability to stroke their fragile ego by playing helpless. I was not raised to play cute, to play dumb, or to play the part of a damsel in distress. I learned to work hard, to develop my skills, to contribute in society, so it drives me crazy when women only depend on sexuality or their fragility. I think there’s a better way. If you’re a woman who gets by with batting your eyelashes, faking incompetence, using your push-up bra, and then complain that you’re not taken seriously in your career or given responsibility in your church, I think you may have believed the reigning cultural lie about what makes us attractive. And if you’re a man and you celebrate femininity only as far as it presence itself through beauty and tenderness, please consider widening your view of what it means to be a woman. Instead, consider things like strength, intelligence, passion, and compassion. Let’s set a new example for young women who are watching us closely. Let’s teach them by example to be women who work hard, who pay attention to their dreams, who give themselves to making the world a better place.
― "Bittersweet" by Shauna Niequist (via yesdarlingido)
There will be a few times in your life when all your instincts will tell you to do something, something that defies logic, upsets your plans, and may seem crazy to others. When that happens, you do it. Listen to your instincts and ignore everything else. Ignore logic, ignore the odds, ignore the complications, and just go for it.
― Judith McNaught, Remember When (via cierrafrances)

(Source: ventriloquistic)

Has it ever struck you that life is all memory, except for the one present moment that goes by you so quick you hardly catch it going?
The Milk Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore by Tennessee Williams (via splitterherzen)

(Source: catharinethegreat)

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